Home » Arlington’s Public Trees » Images of Arlington’s Favorite Trees

Images of Arlington’s Favorite Trees

Arlington residents are invited to contribute to this online gallery

We hope to fill this page with images and writings about trees. Email jpeg or tiff images of your photographs, drawings, or paintings, accompanied by identification, to gallery@arlingtontrees.org. Tree-related prose, poetry, or nonfiction writing can be sent to the same address. At this time we can only accept work in digital format.

ARLINGTON’S FAVORITE TREES

Below are images of some of Arlington’s favorite trees.  If you don’t see your favorite tree here, please send us the species name, location and, if you can, a digital photo.  Following the images is a list of trees for which we hope to obtain pictures. Please, keep your images coming.

Beech on Chapman Road

Beech on Chapman Road

Catalpa on Walnut Street

Catalpa on Walnut Street

 

Star Magnolia at Overlook and Dickson

Star Magnolia at Overlook and Dickson

Sugar Maple at corner of Mass Ave. and Pleasant St.

Sugar Maple at corner of Mass Ave. and Pleasant St.

Willow at Spy Pond in fall

Willow at Spy Pond in fall

Sycamore at Wyman Terrace

Sycamore on Wyman Terrace

Red Maple on Lockeland Avenue

Red Maple on Lockeland Avenue

Willow on Spy Pond

Willow on Spy Pond

Silver Maple on Claremont Avenue

Silver Maple on Claremont Avenue

The Renaissance of the American Elm Tree,
Text by Clarissa Rowe
Photography by Walter Phillips

The American Elm, Ulmus americana, used to be the preferred street tree all over New England. As Donald Wyman said, “No tree has the desirable wave-shaped form of the American Elm.” Because of Dutch elm disease, few of these beautiful trees exist today. Many of the historic photographs of Arlington’s Town Center show an abundance of Elms on the streets of the center. We need to take special care of the remaining elms that grace our town, such as this magnificent tree on Brantwood Road.

Elm on Brantwood Rd

Arlington is fortunate to have a wonderful specimen of the American Elm right on the grounds of Town Hall. This venerable tree needs more care than our limited town budget can supply, however, and interested citizens are taking steps to establish a fund for its long-term maintenance. This tree is an important feature of the historic Town Hall and its gardens, and we want it to be around for future generations to enjoy.

Many public and private groups have been working hard to identify and develop American Elms that are resistant to Dutch Elm Disease (DED). New Jersey-based Princeton Nurseries sells three varieties of DED-resistant trees: Ulmus americana “New Harmony and U. americana “Valley Forge” were developed at the U.S. National Arboretum; U. americana ” Princeton” is a disease-resistant elm developed by Princeton Nurseries. In New Hampshire, the Elm Research Institute, at www.libertyelm.com or 1-800-FOR ELMS, sells their DED-resistant American Liberty Elms to public and private customers. ERI has a “matching tree grant program” that provides small elms, for planting on public lands, at no cost to municipalities designated by private purchasers of larger trees. Programs like these offer hope that the American Elm, one of the noblest shade trees, is indeed making a comeback.

Japanese Maple: "The arborists are very impressed with the age and size of this beautiful specimen in my backyard on School Street." Lynne Eisenberg

Japanese Maple: “The arborists are very impressed with the age and size of this beautiful specimen in my backyard on School Street.” Lynne Eisenberg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

American Elm:  Rte. 16 and Mass Ave.; Brantwood Rd.

Beech:  Several locations:  Winter St. near Mass Ave.; Dearborn Academy; several on Broadway and Warren; Academy St. by Senior Center; several in Mt. Pleasant Cemetery.

Cherry:  Inside entrances to Waldo

Conifer:  169 Charlton St.

Ginkgo:  In front of Arlington High School

Japanese Maple:  School Street (in back yard)

Katsura:  Walnut Street (in a yard)

London Plane:  Mill Street by Mill Brook

Red Bud:  Mass Ave. near the Arlington Diner

Red Oak:  Maple St. in yard behind Robbins Library

Sassafras:  Forest Street (in a yard)

Silver Maple:  Two gigantic ones lining Teel Street

Sourwood: Appleton Street and Mass. Ave.

Tulip Tree:  Corner of Park Ave. and Rte. 2 Service Rd. (in a backyard)

Walnut:  Behind Arlington Town Hall

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